The natural beauty of wood has long made it a favorite material choice for quality furniture. Many woods today are grown and harvested specifically for furniture. This renewable resource is a sound ecological investment, increasing in value over generations.

The following is a brief description of the woods we use for our beds:

ALDER: Alder, part of the birch family, is a softer hardwood from the Pacific Northwest. Consistent color, stability, and uniform acceptance of stains and finishes are some characteristics that have made alder a preferred wood for furniture. Ranking second only to oak as the most commonly used wood, alder offers a look of many fine hardwoods at a value price.

BAMBOO: bamboo is not a wood but a species of grass. Bamboo is truly a remarkable renewable resource and it is a vital non-timber resource. With a tensile strength superior to steel, it is one of the most versatile and durable natural resources in the world. Bamboo is one of the earth's fastest growing plants needing no replanting. Bamboo is durable, sturdy and strong, harder than red oak and maple.ings, but this can often result in an appealing weathered quality.

CEDAR: Cedar is a lightweight and dimensionally stable wood. The presence and prestige of cedar enhances the aesthetic structure of any type or design. It finishes to a richly glowing surface that can be enhanced with a semi-transparent or full-bodied stain.

CHERRY: Also known as fruitwood, cherry is a strong, fine-grained hardwood with a pink undertone, often played up with a medium or dark finish to enhance its mahogany-red tones. Its rich coloring darkens with age and exposure to light. Cherry resists warping and is easy to carve and polish. Cherry is often considered a luxury wood.

MAHOGANY: Mahogany is a tropical medium to hard wood that is indigenous to South America, Central America, and Africa. It has a uniform pore structure, a medium grain, and less defined annual rings. Mahogany ranges from tan to reddish-brown in color, and may display stripe, ribbon, and rope, ripple, or blister figures. Its stability and resistance to decay makes the wood ideal for high-quality furniture.

MAPLE: This is a very light-colored medium to hard wood, abundant in the Eastern United States. Known for its shock resistance, maple has diffused, evenly shaped pores that give the wood a fine texture and even grain. Maple is highly durable and takes a stain well. Maple can be finished to resemble walnut, cherry, or other expensive hardwoods.

PINE: Pine is a soft wood that grows in many varieties, in various parts of the world. Pine's "knotty" characteristics provide warmth and individually to each crafted piece. Usually light yellow in color; the wood has a broadly spaced striation pattern. It is ideal for children's rooms, family rooms, beach houses, and cottages - anywhere you'd like an airier, lighter feel. It's natural grain; knots and shades ensure that no piece is exactly alike. It is excellent for staining.

WALNUT: Prized in North America for high-end furniture, walnut provides strength, hardness, and durability without excessive weight. It has excellent woodworking qualities and takes finishes well. Walnut is light to dark chocolate-brown in color with a straight grain in the trunk.

HARDWOOD vs. SOFTWOOD

Solid woods can be classified as hard or soft. A hardwood is derived from a broad-leafed tree (without needles), such as maple, cherry, oak, walnut, or mahogany. Hardwoods usually offer greater strength and stability. Softwoods come from needle- bearing evergreen trees, such as pine or cedar. Softwoods are more susceptible to marks and the natural beauty of wood has long made it a favorite material choice for quality furniture. Many woods today are grown and harvested specifically for furniture. This renewable resource is a sound ecological investment, increasing in value over generations.
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